Final Electorate Boundaries

Electorate boundaries for the next two general elections have now been fixed with boundary changes for 46 electorates, including an additional general electorate in Auckland.  20 General electorates and five Māori electorates are unchanged.

The electoral boundaries now published are the work of the Representation Commission.  Over 380,000 people have moved into a different electorate. 

The Commission finalised the boundaries of electoral districts after carefully considering objections and counter-objections.

You can view interactive maps of the current and new electorate boundaries here.

You can download sections of the Report of the Representation Commission 2014 here:

You can also download a copy of the Representation Commission's Maps of Final Electoral Districts 2014 (PDF 36.98MB). This book contains maps that illustrate the Electoral Boundaries defined by the Representation Commission.  Please see Schedule E of the Report of the Representation Commission 2014 for authoritative plans that accurately define the boundaries as required by the Electoral Act 1993.

Electorate quotas and the determination of boundaries

The Electoral Act 1993 imposes strict electoral population limits binding on the Commission.  These provide an overall constraint to ensure that there are approximately equal numbers of people in each electorate so that they have equality of representation in Parliament.  All electorates must contain electoral populations varying not more than ±5% from the following quotas which are calculated in accordance with the Act:

  Quota ±5% Allowance
North Island General Electorates 59,731 ±2,986
South Island General Electorates 59,679 ±2,983
Māori Electorates  60,141 ±3,007

Within those allowances the Commission, in dividing New Zealand into General electorates, is required by law to give due consideration to:

  • existing electoral district boundaries,
  • community of interest,
  • facilities of communications,
  • topographical features, and
  • any projected variation in the general electoral population of those districts during their life. 

In dividing New Zealand into the Māori electoral districts the Commission is required by law to give due consideration to:

  • the existing boundaries of the Māori electoral districts,
  • community of interest among the Māori people generally and members of Māori iwi,
  • facilities of communications,
  • topographical features, and
  • any projected variation in the Māori electoral population of those districts during their life.

 

Last updated: 13 October 2014