Proposed electorate boundaries

The proposed electoral boundaries now published are the work of the Representation Commission.  The proposed boundaries have been notified simultaneously to the general public and to Members of Parliament. 

They are put forward for public discussion and for appropriate modification or adjustment through the objection and counter-objection process.  The Commission have finalised the boundaries of electoral districts after carefully considering objections and counter-objections.

You can view interactive maps of the current and proposed electorate boundaries here.

Electorate quotas and the determination of boundaries

The Electoral Act 1993 imposes strict electoral population limits binding on the Commission.  These provide an overall constraint to ensure that there are approximately equal numbers of people in each electorate so that they have equality of representation in Parliament.  All electorates must contain electoral populations varying not more than ±5% from the following quotas which are calculated in accordance with the Act:

 

Quota

±5% Allowance

North Island General Electorates

59,731

±2,986

South Island General Electorates

59,679

±2,983

Māori Electorates

60,141

±3,007

Within those allowances the Commission, in dividing New Zealand into General electorates, is required by law to give due consideration to:

  • existing electoral district boundaries,
  • community of interest,
  • facilities of communications,
  • topographical features, and
  • any projected variation in the general electoral population of those districts during their life. 

In dividing New Zealand into the Māori electoral districts the Commission is required by law to give due consideration to:

  • the existing boundaries of the Māori electoral districts,
  • community of interest among the Māori people generally and members of Māori iwi,
  • facilities of communications,
  • topographical features, and
  • any projected variation in the Māori electoral population of those districts during their life.

General Reasons

Although growth in population and its redistribution throughout the country has influenced the electoral boundaries that this Commission proposes, the Commission has also given consideration to the other statutory criteria.  Retention of existing boundaries is a necessary consideration. 

With that consideration in mind the Commission has been able to retain 20 of the existing 63 General electorates of which seven are in the South Island and 13 in the North Island. 

The remaining 43 General electorates required change to a greater or lesser degree because they stand in the path of population change.  There is a need to balance those electorates having regard to the quota and also to make way for a new North Island electorate.

In the case of the Māori electorates the Commission has been able to retain all of the electoral boundaries.

The splitting of small communities has been avoided where possible and the Commission has endeavoured to place communities in the same electorate as the adjoining area with which it has the most interaction.  It is conscious that this has not been achieved in all instances because of the requirement to balance factors of quota limits and other statutory criteria constraints.

 

Last updated: 12 September 2014