About the Referendum Choices

In the Referendum, voters chose between five voting systems.

The information provided to help them make their choice is below. This information was available through brochures, advertising and a dedicated website.

MMP – Mixed Member Proportional

This is the system we currently use to elect our Parliament. Each voter gets two votes. The first vote is for the political party the voter chooses. This is called the party vote.  The second vote is to choose the MP the voter wants to represent the electorate they live in. This is called the electorate vote.

A political party that wins at least one electorate seat OR 5% of the party vote gets a share of the seats in Parliament that is about the same as its share of the party vote. Read more about MMP - Mixed Member Proportional.

FPP - First Past the Post

Each voter has one vote to choose the MP they want to represent the electorate they live in. The candidate who gets the most votes wins. Read more about FPP - First Past the Post.

PV - Preferential Voting

Voters rank the candidates – 1, 2, 3, etc – in the order they prefer them. A candidate who gets more than half of all the first preference votes (that is votes marked “1”) wins. If no candidate gets more than half the first preference votes, the candidate with the fewest number “1” votes is eliminated and their votes go to the candidates each voter ranked next.

This process is repeated until one candidate has more than half the votes. Read more about PV - Preferential Voting.

STV - Single Transferable Vote

Each voter has a single vote that is transferable. Voters either rank the individual candidates – 1, 2, 3, etc – in the order they prefer from all the candidates, OR they may vote for the order of preference published in advance by the political party of their choice. It is likely MPs would be divided between 24 and 30 electorates, each with 3 to 7 MPs.

MPs are elected by receiving a minimum number of votes. This is known as the quota and is based on the number of votes in each electorate and the number of MPs to be elected. Candidates who reach the quota from first preference votes are elected. Read more about STV - Single Transferable Vote.

SM - Supplementary Member

Each voter gets two votes. The first vote is to choose the MP the voter wants to represent the electorate they live in. This is called the electorate vote. The second vote is for the political party the voter chooses. This is called the party vote.

The share of seats each party gets reflects its share of the party vote. However, the number of seats is based on the number of supplementary seats available. This makes SM different from MMP where a party’s share of all the seats in Parliament mirrors its share of the party vote. Read more about SM- Supplementary Member.

Last updated: 18 February 2013